Anonymous

Can A Landlord Charge Me For Replacing Carpet When I Move Out?

11 Answers

Aisha Profile
Aisha answered
Well, if the carpet is 6 1/2 years old, it must be considered as normal wear and tear. The average time for replacement of a carpet is 3-4 years. Your landlord must not charge you for replacing the carpet or even the paint as it is now his duty to replace all these items. You can file a complaint against him.
thanked the writer.
Anonymous
Anonymous commented
With the carpet being so old if i was a landlord i would certainly not charge u. Wear & tear on a carpet is approx.3-4 years and painting no - best to leave that until you leave house.
John Profile
John answered
This sounds like all the court cases on the judge Joe brown show. It depends on if it is in the contract you signed and if he can prove that you are the one that destroyed or failed to maintain the place in which you stayed. Or if you can prove that the carpet and walls and things we're in the shape you say they we're in when you moved in to the place .you should have noted all this on the renters agreement when you moved in and out of the place. You should have also taken pictures when you moved in and when you moved out to prevent the landlord from being able to claim that your responsible for the repairs.
thanked the writer.
John
John commented
i like it because he does not take their action/breaking the laws to be okay no matter where /how they live. and tells them to grow up and act like an adult instead of like a couple of kids.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I'm new here....I live in Oklahoma and out here, when you re-decorate any thing in the RENT house you live in, they take it OFF the rent that month....they do NOT charge you for them repairs...unless it says so in your LEASE, then you are NOT responsible to pay anything extra...look on Google, and look up the RENTER'S RIGHTS!..for your state, it will have it all listed...hope that helped...
NASSY NASCARNUT Profile
NASSY NASCARNUT answered
No, you are not in any way, shape or form responsible for paint nor carpet as these are said duties of the landlord.  And provided there are no holes in the walls or the like I would demand I receive my security deposit be returned to me within 30 days of vacating the residence!  As I slam my gavel...that is the law!
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The landlord has should be able to depreciate the cost or new carpet using the dates the old carpet was installed.  Then depreciates it over time in your case.  The land lord cannot charge you for painting.  That is normal wear and tear and is part of the apartment turnover.  So be gentle, ask the land lord to depreciate the new carpet expenses over time based on when it was new  It is a cost they can ask for
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Not normally. Unless the contract stipulated that your deposit would be used to cover these cost. Normal wear and tear applies to "normal wear and tear" If you have been putting a engine together in your living room this would not apply. LOL Painting of the walls is normal, and they must do this in most states before it is rented again. These items however are not your responsibility, unless they have been used in other than normal circumstances. Even nail holes for pictures or considered normal. But if you have temper and you punch a hole in the wall, in a fit of rage, this will not be NORMAL. LOL Hope this helps. Pets that are not disclosed to the landlord in the onset of the rental agreement may allow the landlord to keep some or all of your deposit to replace these itmes.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
No you should not be be charged
Mel Brandle Profile
Mel Brandle answered

The carpet is a part of the apartment and as a fixture, it is included inside the rental fee that is charged to you. In my opinion anyway. Unless you have stained, or damaged the carpet in any way during your stay, you shouldn't be liable to make any payments for it. Same for storage shelves and painting and furniture.

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Depends on if the damage is such that it exceeds normal wear and tear. I do not know how the landlord could prove that.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
No he can't. If there was any issues with the condition the property was in when you moved out you wouldn't get your deposit back. That's the purpose of a landlord taking a deposit from tenants when they first move in. Sounds like he's just trying it on!
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
I would double check your landlord tenant laws but that should be covered under your deposit and should not be chargeable. I am not a lawyer but this is my belief. Again double check the Landlord Tenant laws and your rental agreement

Answer Question

Anonymous