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What Is Punishment For First Degree Murder?

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Life in prison or death penalty in some states.
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Murder in the first degree is usually the most severe form of murder and is punished in many different ways depending upon the state. In most states, first degree murder is willful and deliberate homicide and may be divided into premeditated murder and felony murder. In some states. In general, the penalty for first degree murder may range from a term of years to life without parole or even death. For the most part, those found guilty of first degree murder will go to a maximum security facility for a substantial amount of time. Nearly all states punish first degree murder with life sentences with the exception of Alaska. Prior to the 1980's, most states did not have a sentence known as "life without parole," so it was normal for a first degree murderer to be eligible for parole after a certain period of time (which could have been as little as 5 years). During the 1970's; however, many states began to buff up the amount of time violent offenders would be required to serve before becoming eligible for parole. Here are some sentence examples:

Virginia: Between 20 years and life (for death penalty, charge is capital murder)
West Virginia: 15 years to life
Texas: Between 5 years and life (for death penalty, charge is capital murder)
Louisiana: Death or life without parole
Massachusetts: Life without parole
Maryland: Death, life without parole or 25 years to life
Indiana: Death or life without parole
New York: 20 - 25 years to life (or LWOP)
Maine: Life imprisonment without parole
Arkansas: Death or life without parole
Florida: Death or life without parole
Michigan: Mandatory life without parole
North Carolina: Death or life without parole
Connecticut: Death or life without parole
Oklahoma: Death or life without parole
Iowa: Life imprisonment
Pennsylvania: Death or life without parole
New Jersey: Between 30 years and life with parole eligibility after 30 years (or after 63 years, 9 months if charged under NERA)

Some of these states have parole, while others do not, so the actual time served will vary some. Hope this helps......God bless

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