What Is The Dual-court System And Why Do We Have One In The United States Of America?

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Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered

The dual court system is the distinction of state and federal courts that make up the judicial branch of government. Where a case does not involve the government or multiple states, the state court has been assigned jurisdiction as stated in the United States Constitution. There has been some talk of court unification at different points over the last century, but it has not taken place universally. The court system was not set up in one chunk and has, over time and in many different areas, been generated piece by piece. A primary factor to maintaining the dual-court system is the sheer cost and amount of time it would take for the U.S. Supreme Court or one governing body to hear and sentence every offence no matter how large or small.

Courts are an essential aspect of the criminal justice system. It is necessary to sustain separate systems, which include police, court, and correction, locally, at the state level, and federally, depending on the situation. If there were only one massive police force and corrections organization dealing with a monolithic court system, effectiveness would be minimal. All criminal activity requires a judge's presence and ruling after the individual has been arrested. It is far more efficient for each of the countless locations, nationwide, to have a municipal court system in place.

Jeremy Whitley Profile
Jeremy Whitley answered
The dual court system is the distinction of state and federal courts that make up the judicial branch of government. Where a case does not involve the government or multiple states, the state court has been assigned jurisdiction as stated in the United States Constitution. There has been some talk of court unification at different points over the last century, but it has not taken place universally. The court system was not set up in one chunk and has, over time and in many different areas, been generated piece by piece. A primary factor to maintaining the dual-court system is the sheer cost and amount of time it would take for the U.S. Supreme Court or one governing body to hear and sentence every offence no matter how large or small.    Courts are an essential aspect of the criminal justice system. It is necessary to sustain separate systems, which include police, court, and correction, locally, at the state level, and federally, depending on the situation. If there were only one massive police force and corrections organization dealing with a monolithic court system, effectiveness would be minimal. All criminal activity requires a judge's presence and ruling after the individual has been arrested. It is far more efficient for each of the countless locations, nationwide, to have a municipal court system in place.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
Actually it all ties in with "Checks and Balances" One court system is for criminal justice and everything tied along with such things and the other deals with money currency and everything og that nature. We have a dual court system to make sure that every trial is fair and that no one court system may over rule and be more powerful than any other. They all keep eachother in check.
Toni Wolfe-Pack Profile
Toni Wolfe-Pack answered
The dual court system is the Federal court and the State court. We have on in the USA as a way to do checks and balances on laws that the constitution put into place.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The dual court system is the distinction of state and federal courts that make up the judicial branch of government.
Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered

The dual court system allows the federal government limited access into each state' s judicial matters and state law cannot involve them in the federal judicial system; unless there is a conflict at the state or federal levels.

Anonymous Profile
Anonymous answered
The state and federal courts that make up the judicial branch. Like a sort of federalism between the state and federal levels.

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